Proper 25, Year A: Matthew 22: 34-46: Commanded to Love

Jesus Christ mosaic icon

Source: iStockphoto.com

You can see all the lectionary readings for the Proper 25, Year A by clicking here. I have chosen to discuss the passage from the Gospel of Matthew.

The Pharisees are questioning Jesus again. This time an expert in the Law of Moses asks Jesus this: “Teacher, which command in the law is the most important?”

Jesus says, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your mind.’ This is the first and most important command. And the second command is like the first: ‘Love your neighbor the same as you love yourself.’ All of the law and the writings of the prophets take their meaning from these two commands.”

If this was meant to be a trick question, Jesus answered it well. And I think it’s an important lesson for Christians today–such a succinct answer for how we should live. Love God and love others. Love in this case is not some mushy feeling but an unconditional love and an action. You have to choose to live that love–it’s not just the emotion of a moment. It takes work and practice. Love does not always come easily. We must make it a part of every aspect of our lives as much as possible.

Next, Jesus asks them a tricky question in return: “What do you think about the Messiah? Whose son is he?”

They give the accepted answer: “The Messiah is the Son of David.”

So Jesus says,

“Then why did David call him ‘Lord’? David was speaking by the power of the Spirit. He said,

‘The Lord God said to my Lord:
Sit by me at my right side,
    and I will put your enemies under your control.’

David calls the Messiah ‘Lord.’ So how can he be David’s son?”

He is quoting from a Psalm here, and the Psalms are generally believed to be written by David. The Pharisees have no answer for his puzzling question, so they were not brave enough after that to ask him any more challenging questions.

 

I love how Jesus turns the tables on them and gives them their own theological challenge–except in their case they have no answer. He challenges them to contemplate the Messiah in a new way–as someone like David but also greater than David. They don’t know what to make of it.

Proper 17, Year A: Matthew 16:21-26: Lose Yourself

Saint Peter Painting

St. Peter – Source: iStockphoto.com

You can see all the lectionary readings for the Proper 17, Year A by clicking here. I have chosen to discuss the passage from the Gospel of Matthew.

Jesus tells his disciples that he has to go to Jerusalem, where he will suffer and be killed, then he will rise from the dead. Wow, can you imagine how that came across?  How do you think you would have reacted to that? Well, we know Peter’s reaction: “God save you from those sufferings, Lord! That will never happen to you!” 

Jesus rebukes him harshly, “Get away from me, Satan! You are not helping me! You don’t care about the same things God does. You care only about things that people think are important.” (These quotes are from the Easy-to-Read version here.) Ouch, he called him Satan! I don’t think Jesus was implying Peter was literally possessed by Satan or anything, but more that he is speaking against God and what God wants at this moment. Remember that just last week we read about Peter being called the Rock on which the church will be built. What a change to this story! It happens to all of us–faithful and loving one time, failing and wrong another time. Meanwhile he just wants Jesus to not die, which doesn’t seem so awful to our human eyes. It seems Peter understand Jesus was the Messiah, but not all that might mean. 

Jesus goes on to say the following:

If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. For what will it profit them if they gain the whole world but forfeit their life? Or what will they give in return for their life?

Matthew 16:24-26 (NRSV)

I love it when Jesus speaks in paradoxes. Maybe that’s weird of me. Lose your life to save it. Amazing. What does this mean to you? What are you giving of yourself today? How are you following Jesus?

Proper 9, Year A: Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30: Rest for the Weary

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Interior of St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague, Czech Republic – Source: iStockphoto.com

It took me longer than expected to get back to blogging, so I am a few weeks behind. Only a couple days after my son spent more time than expected in the hospital, I fell and dislocated my elbow pretty badly. I am only this week able to type with both hands again.

You can see all the lectionary readings for the Proper 9, Year A by clicking here. I have chosen to discuss the passage from the Gospel of Matthew.

In today’s gospel, Jesus responds to comparisons of his ministry to John the Baptist’s ministry. John had been an ascetic, living very simply, subsisting on very little and living like the extremely poor people of the time. Jesus was more celebratory, and was called, “a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners”. John was ministering in a time of waiting for the Messiah, and the wait was meant abstaining and preparing. Jesus’ ministry is more celebratory, because he is the fulfillment of the promise of the Messiah.

He goes on to say that God has hidden things from the wise and revealed them to children. I think what he’s talking about here is that many of the learned people in his society rejected his message and him, but that the poor and marginalized people followed him. This was a great part of how Jesus ended up being criminalized by the powers-that-be. He was too influential over masses of people and preaching a dangerous philosophy of the last shall be first and love and hope. The powerful do not want the people under their feet to have that much hope.

Then we have one of Jesus’ most famous and beautiful sayings:

“Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

Hope for the hopeless. Rest for the weary. Jesus gives it.