The Epiphany, Year B: Matthew 2:1-12: Light in Darkness

Epiphany

Source: iStockphoto.com

You can see all the lectionary readings for The Epiphany, Year B by clicking here. I have chosen to discuss the passage from the Gospel of Matthew. I have also chosen to do the Epiphany readings even though it doesn’t fall on a Sunday. The readings for The First Sunday after the Epiphany can be found here.

The story of the Epiphany is the story of the Wise Men (or Magi) coming to visit baby Jesus–a story you’ve likely heard before. The singular word for Magi is Magus (where we get the word magician), so they were men of learning, some maybe astrologers reading portents in the sky. We have a  tradition of them being kings and that there were three of them, but that’s not found in the text itself–there’s no indication of a number other than that they presented three gifts. These Wise Men believed they could see the news of a king’s birth in the stars, so they came to find the king who had been born. They only knew he was born king of the Jews, so they first went to the leader of the Jews (but a leader who was a puppet king and collaborator with Roman rule–Herod). Herod was not happy to hear a king had been born, but he didn’t tell the Magi that. He told them to let him know when they found him and he had priests and teachers of the Jewish law advise the Magi on where a king might be born.

The Magi went on to Bethlehem, where they found Jesus, honored him, and gave him expensive gifts. Then they went home a different way because God warned them in a dream not to tell Herod where to find the baby Jesus.

In The First Christmas, a great little book by Marcus Borg and John Dominic Crossan, they talk about the theme of light in the darkness in this story.

The story of the star does not make a statement about an astronomical phenomenon, but a statement about Jesus: his birth is the coming of the light that draws wise men of the Gentiles to its radiance.

The First Christmas (p. 182, Kindle Edition)

 

This makes me think of my last post about Jesus being both the Word of God and the light shining in the darkness. Jesus is that for us from that day to this.

First Sunday After Christmas, Year B: John 1:1-18: The Word and the Light

Stained Glass

Source: iStockphoto.com

You can see all the lectionary readings for the First Sunday after Christmas, Year B by clicking here. I have chosen to discuss the passage from the Gospel of John.

I’ve always thought of John as the intellectual Gospel, with its more complex theology and imagery than the synoptic gospels. This is evident from the very beginning of John, which starts at the very beginning of time (whereas Matthew and Luke start with the birth of Jesus and Mark starts with John the Baptist).

The first verses are beautiful and poetic even in a simple translation:

Before the world began, the Word was there. The Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was there with God in the beginning. Everything was made through him, and nothing was made without him. In him there was life, and that life was a light for the people of the world. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not defeated it.

John 1:1-5 (Easy to Read Version)

I found something about this in Evolution of the Word by Marcus J. Borg:

What John says about Jesus and the Word is sometimes misunderstood. For many Christians, Jesus and the Word of God have become identical and interchangeable terms. Thus they understand John’s opening words to mean, In the beginning was Jesus, and Jesus was with God, and Jesus was God.” But that is not what John says. What was in the beginning with God was the Word/Wisdom of God. But Jesus wasn’t there in the beginning; that which became flesh in him was. Jesus is the embodiment and revelation of what can be seen of the Word/Wisdom of God in a human life.

Borg also says that the “‘word of God’” in Judaism is closely associated with the wisdom of God, and that God created the world through wisdom, wisdom spoke through the prophets, and wisdom (like the Spirit of God) permeates everything.

Then the Gospel introduces John the Baptist–reiterating what we know from the other Gospels–that John was not the light but came to tell people about the light (Jesus).

So Jesus is both the light and the Word and the passage goes on to say that “the Word became a man and lived among us.” The imagery is all beautiful and moving. For me it cuts straight to the heart. And the deeper theology is also at the end of the passage: “The only Son is the one who has shown us what God is like. He is himself God and is very close to the Father.

 

 

Lent 5, Year A: John 11:1-45 : Jesus Raises Lazarus From the Dead

Jesus Raising Lazarus

Jesus Raising Lazarus – iStock.com/traveler1116

You can see all the lectionary readings for the Fifth Sunday of Lent, Year A by clicking here. I have chosen to discuss only the Gospel reading.

This week’s Gospel lesson is a pretty famous one. Before Jesus rose from the dead, he brought another man back from the dead, his dear friend named Lazarus.

The first part of the story is a little puzzling. Jesus receives a message from Lazarus’ sisters, Martha and Mary, telling him his beloved friend is ill. Jesus hears it and said, “This illness does not lead to death; rather it is for God’s glory, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.”  Continue reading